Posts Tagged ‘collective insanity’

Stopping Climate Change Will Take a Change of Heart

August 22, 2014

You and I know that these could be our last years on earth, and our children’s too. We’ve known since the 1970s that our greenhouse gas production is driving climate change. The nightmare sequels, we now know, may include global famine from cropland desertification and collapse of the marine food chain as CO2 sours the seas. To their credit, many men and women of good will are responding by innovating, protesting, going off-grid and eating more simply. Protest actions against a major coal-fired power plant have led to plans for its closure. But the mitigations put in place have consistently seemed too little, too late, and profiteers, enabled by an “anything goes” culture that cares little about truth-telling, are still generating PR claims that natural gas and plutonium are “green,” and elected officials are buying it. Global demand for an ever-higher standard of living, along with capital’s need to milk that demand for ever-higher levels of corporate profit and power, still trump any sustained and coordinated effort to intervene for the common good. Can a People’s Climate March hope to change this? Can any raising of voices or massing of numbers?

A man-made doomsday

How shall we name the situation? There are too many people on the planet saying Me first, or groups of people saying Us first. We’re choking on human selfishness. What’s looming ahead of us is a man-made doomsday attributable entirely to human greed, lying, willed inattention – let’s call it by its right name: human evil. And it’s not just the evil of bankers, fossil-fuel CEOs, and their hirelings in government that we’re looking at, but a spiritual sickness we all share: for we all try to tilt reality in our own favor, sometimes hiding the truth to protect our own skin, often turning a blind eye to the suffering of others. If we stand on moral ground no higher than the “culprits” of climate change, dare we hope to change their ways?

Another way of seeing the situation

But this scenario is built around fear, and the expectation of scarcity and death.

Scarcity and death are not God’s will for us, as the witness of God in your own heart will tell you if you will listen for it. The scriptural testimonies of humans who have known the heart of our Creator confirm this: in Isaiah 45:18, God declares that God created the world “not in vain, but to be inhabited.” The apocryphal Wisdom of Solomon makes the amazing assertion that God “did not create death, but the ungodly, with their hands and their words, drew death to them” (Wisdom 1:13-16), and the prophet Ezekiel records God as saying, “I have no pleasure in the death of him that dies” (Ez. 18:32, 33:11). In the Sermon of the Good Shepherd, Jesus declares, “I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly” (John 10:10), contrasting His role with that of the sheep-rustler whose work is only to destroy. Jesus taught that it was God’s will not to judge and condemn, but only to forgive and heal, and Jesus modeled this divine love by laying down His life for souls gone astray, forgiving even His own murderers. How perfectly or imperfectly the Jesus of scripture reflects the actual character of the God who gave you life and consciousness, again, is something you can ask the witness of God in your own heart. Expect an answer.

The climate crisis will not be overcome by forcing or persuading the “sheep-rustlers” to stop destroying the environment. Neither is there any good done by punishing, condemning or scapegoating them, not even in your fantasies, for “with what judgment you judge, you shall be judged” (Matt. 7:2), and Jesus also taught that refusal to forgive our enemies keeps us unable to receive God’s forgiveness (Matt. 6:14-15).

Forgive and be forgiven

But there is a larger point to be made about forgiveness: it is the revolutionary principle that can change the world. It is the only revolutionary principle that can change the world. The social, economic and political world that is now cooking itself with greenhouse gases is one that runs on the principle of scapegoating: that is, morally imperfect persons with injured consciences (that’s all of us) seek the healing of their injured consciences by imputing evil to other people and then, to the best of their ability, driving those others out of society. This is the origin of war, slavery, the subjugation of women and countless other evils. Like an addictive drug, scapegoating numbs the pangs of conscience, but does not heal the injury. But extending universal forgiveness does, and the empowerment that comes with being healed and receiving divine forgiveness knows no limits.

Let us try, then, what love can do. Forgiveness is an act of will, not a matter of having the right feelings; anyone can do it. It does not require reconciliation with people who have hurt us, and whom we would rather have nothing more to do with. It asks of us only that we make the effort to wish them the same eternal happiness we would wish for ourselves.

God is the Elephant in the Room

July 28, 2014

God is the elephant in the room.

The “elephant in the room,” according to Wikipedia, is “an English metaphorical idiom for an obvious truth that is either being ignored or going unaddressed” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elephant_in_the_room). Although references to the elephant in the room go at least as far back as George Berkeley (1685-1753), my memory tells me that the twist currently given to the “elephant” trope may date back to Knots (1970) by R. D. Laing (1927-1989) – (can any reader confirm this for me?) – the point of which is: there is a rule against ever mentioning the elephant in the room, and there is also a second rule: namely, that the rule against mentioning the elephant, and this second rule itself, forbidding mention of the first rule, are both unmentionable.

Therapy

Therapy

There is a plausible reason for these truth-suppressing rules: if there is an almighty, ever-present God who guides our steps, thoughts and tongue, then God is a Reality that overshadows – nay, swallows up – all other realities :  for in him we live, and move, and have our being (Acts 17:28a). Again, the Lord abides in the heart of all beings, O Arjuna, causing them to turn round by His power as if they were mounted on a machine; he who sees Me everywhere and sees all in Me, I am not lost to him nor is he lost to Me (Bhagavad Gītā 18:61 and 6:30, Radhakrishnan translation). If, moreover, this God loves us, forgives us everything, and intends our perfection and our return to everlasting bliss in His-Her embrace, as our hearts tell us a good God ought to do, then what better thing to do than hasten fearlessly and unswervingly down the paths God has laid out from us, always welcoming God’s corrections, trying to love all creatures as ardently as God loves us, rejoicing that God’s will always intends what’s best for us, ever imploring God for a fuller revelation of God’s presence? But we don’t, because we don’t see things that way, and frankly, we don’t really want to. Now if to be insane is to be out of touch with reality, or to be in denial of it and walking in a fictitious reality instead, – then, if God is as all-good and all-encompassing as we suppose God to be, almost all of us are insane almost all of the time.

But clearly this won’t do: we can’t have lunatics jiggling our prime interest rate, doing brain surgery on our loved ones, or discerning who constitutes a terrorist threat! We therefore pronounce ourselves sane and banish God to a distant throne: if we can’t have no God at all, let’s at least have an indifferent god who doesn’t care what we worms do, or a sulking god who dropped off scriptures ages ago and now waits in silence for the day he can reward or punish us for what we’ve done with them. Whatever: for the moment, the god seems to be staying quiet and letting us get away with our don’t-mention-the-elephant game. We’re safe for now: our kingdom has come, and our will is being done on earth: national security, economic growth, better orgasms and entertainment, whatever exalts this life of the mortal body.

Could it be that there’s a second elephant in the room?

The second unmentionable elephant in the room is the Deceiver. I have no inside information on his – or its – nature or ontological status: has “he” a consciousness, a will-to-power, a hatred of all that God loves? Is he/it merely a life-defiling, truth-denying, soulless algorithm generated by the collective unconscious of fallen humanity? Could “it” be nothing more than a spiritual process of entropy inherent in a fallen creation, tending ever downward toward darkness and chaos? Only God knows, and for the purposes of this discussion it doesn’t matter, but whether this Father of Lies is more properly called “he” or “it,” we are in bondage to him. He dominates every government that rules by force and fear rather than love – which is to say, every armed government in human history, every enterprise that holds the threat of financial ruin over its employees’ heads, every institution that gets its way by bullying. He rules every corporation that seeks advantage over its competitors, including religious bodies that compete for converts. He inspires every effort to seduce consumers into buying things they don’t need. He is the superintendent of every school that teaches children to compete with their fellows for the highest grades and the privileges that go with them. Wherever more value is claimed for self than for the common good, the Deceiver reigns; wherever well-intentioned liars and manipulators think “let us do and excuse this evil, that good may result,” they are among his slaves. We swim in his culture as fish swim in water, many of us scarcely aware that this Deceiver, whom scripture calls “the god of this world” (2 Corinthians 4:4), is distinct from the God who created us and loves us.

It is this second elephant in the room that keeps the first elephant unmentionable.

Fortunately, almighty God has already defeated the Deceiver, and upholds all those who resist the Deceiver’s attempts to lure us back into bondage. But this good news needs to be spread, far and wide. The time is short.