Archive for the ‘God’s universal love’ Category

Black Lives Matter in the Kingdom of God

July 12, 2016

There are many men and women living today who can witness that the kingdom of God is no mere figure of speech, but a real government whose citizenship they enjoy, under whose protection they walk, and to which they’re bound by civic duties they discharge gladly, even when it costs them pain. Whether or not they speak a Christian language, they’ve said in their heart, “Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done,” and their rightful Ruler has graciously responded by so arranging events that they can no longer doubt the exercise of a mysterious and benign oversight over their steps, even if their path may lead through unfair treatment, disease, disability, oppression, and abuse, to the death that eventually comes to us all. Though this may be incomprehensible to people to whom it hasn’t happened, something has occurred to awaken a faith in them that may afterwards be dimmed by setbacks, but can no longer be snuffed out.

A necessary step in this development of faith is a growth of trust in the character of God. We might begin with the intuition that, full though the world may be of injustice, our sense of justice must have been built into us by a Creator who loves justice also. (“He that planted the ear, shall he not hear? he that formed the eye, shall he not see?” Psalm 94:9 KJV). Then how can such a God allow the cruel to kill the innocent? We don’t know why God allows what God allows, but our hearts assure us that God never wills evil. For God is love (1 John 4:8), and Love desires what benefits all. If we are made “in God’s likeness,” this likeness includes the freedom to choose the right thing or the wrong; and fear, hate, selfishness and ignorance often tempt us to stray. But faith gives us hope that God corrects wrongdoers, in this life or another, and that God “wipes away all tears from the eyes” (Rev. 7:17, 21:4) of those who have been wronged.

Black lives matter in the kingdom of God, where God delights in all of God’s children, and wishes us all to give one another joy and not grief. This can only happen when long-standing patterns of injustice have been corrected, not by vengeance-begetting vengeance, but by truth and reconciliation. But for this process to begin, someone must go first. And to help create an atmosphere in which it’s safe to go first – I speak especially to my fellow enjoyers of white privilege – you must ask forgiveness of someone you’ve wronged, or extend forgiveness to someone who’s wronged you. It needn’t be across racial lines; it can be your own parent, partner or child. If you engage in a predatory or oppressive practice, even one as “mild” as hurtful speech about absent third parties, you must stop. Contagious hard-heartedness has spread far enough. It’s time for a contagion of tenderness.

“God’s Beloved Darlings” Means Everybody

May 8, 2016

In one of my classes at Earlham School of Religion I recently spoke of “God’s beloved darlings, which means everybody.” The words that had come out of my mouth both surprised me and didn’t surprise me at all:

For we all, Hitler and Stalin included, as well as dogs, cats, and earthworms, are the souls that God loved enough to create, and through their eyes He/She looks out on creation, and through their hearts He/She experiences their thoughts and feelings.

Even if we choose to damn ourselves by loving darkness rather than light (John 3:19), and putting the greatest possible separation between ourselves and God’s truth, fairness, mercy, goodness and beauty, that can’t stop the Omniscient One from experiencing our sufferings as we experience them, or the Most Compassionate One from extending the greatest possible compassion to us: “If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: if I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there,” Ps 139:8 KJV.

I wish that I might have no other heart than God’s to love with, no other wisdom than God’s to guide that love with, distant though that goal might seem to me now. But is it really so distant? All that’s necessary is the removal of the walls that partition off “me” from my infinitely good Creator. Anyway, what better thing is there to ask God for?