Politics and the Kingdom of God

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From a letter recently e-mailed to a friend:

May I, dare I, tell you how my own politics have gotten shaped by life at ___ Meeting?
 
My greatest discovery is that the Kingdom of God is a real thing. God, or Christ, or the Holy Spirit, Om or Allah, my Higher Power or Absolute Love — different names, but only one Divine Will — will rule with absolute wisdom in all your affairs if you let Him/Her/It. To the extent that your affairs include an outside world (and I’m told that it is far more a projection of our inner condition than we like to think), God will tell you what to do with it, or about it, including economic and political behavior.

In that regard, God has been teaching me not to justify evil means by reference to “good” ends, not to call evil good (not even a “lesser” evil), not to tell untruths; but also not to quarrel with those who oppose me, for “the servant of the Lord must not strive,” 2 Timothy 2:24 — a verse of Scripture I’ve had “opened” to me, as we Quakers say.

For that reason I’ve stopped voting, and stopped investing energy and hope in that ritualized contest of wills called partisan politics, which I count as one of the “carnal weapons” the Apostle advised us to put away (2 Corinthians 10:4). Though the United States considers me a citizen, to me it’s only my host country. It rules with fear and compulsion, but my King rules only with love.

As a citizen, heir and ambassador of the Kingdom of God, I have the privilege and responsibility to offer its peace and healing (as much as I allow myself to have its peace and healing) to Republican and Democrat alike, rich and poor, wise and foolish, established citizen and illegal alien, the respected and the outcast. I believe that only this can bring sanity to this great insane asylum whose infrastructure we see, even now, breaking down as our mother earth sheds forest cover, topsoil, icecap and coral reef faster than we can legislate our pathetic little industry-friendly interventions and controls. As we watch the asylum’s walls crumble, it’s important not to shout at the guards and fleeing inmates, “you’re all mad!” even though their behavior may suggest it, but rather to model sanity as best we can and speak to the tender, the loving, and the sane one in each of them. It can’t be long before our faithfulness bears visible fruit.

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